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How does Windows Defender Offline protect endpoints?

Windows Defender Offline can help tackle malware infections that the basic version of Windows Defender can't remove. Expert Michael Cobb explains how.

How does Windows Defender Offline work; is it different from Windows Defender? Should it be used in addition to...

other malware defense?

Windows Defender was first released by Microsoft as a free download for Windows XP to scan for malicious spyware. Later releases of Windows included it by default, and since Windows 8, it has included antivirus capabilities as well as anti-spyware features. It starts running as soon as the Windows operating system starts, but it will turn itself off if an alternative antivirus application is installed on the machine. Most enterprises deploy antimalware software from vendors such as ESET, McAfee and Kaspersky Lab, so Windows Defender, although present, is typically not providing malware protection on employees' client devices. However, for individuals, it is an important security tool that provides ongoing protection with regularly scheduled malware scans.

If Windows Defender finds a malware program it can't remove, it will prompt the user to download and run Windows Defender Offline. This is a standalone antimalware program that runs from a bootable disk and can run a more complete scan of an infected system while the operating system is offline. If possible, it's best to download Windows Defender Offline and create a CD, DVD or USB flash drive using a PC that isn't infected with malware, as any malware that is present may be able to block the download and media-creation process. Note that both PCs must have the same Windows operating system architecture -- either 32-bit or 64-bit -- as the downloaded version of Windows Defender Offline.

For users who don't have access to more than one computer, it would clearly be best to download Windows Defender Offline before they receive a prompt from Microsoft Security Essentials or Windows Defender. However, Windows Defender Offline relies on definitions to be able to recognize and remove any threats, so it would need to be repeatedly downloaded to keep it up to date. A USB flash drive is the best option, as it can be reused and Windows Defender Offline will update the definitions whenever the wizard is run.

To run Windows Defender Offline, the up-to-date CD, DVD or USB flash drive should be inserted into the PC, all open work saved and closed, and the PC restarted. Some PCs will detect removable media and offer the option of starting up from the CD, DVD or USB flash drives. Others require the user to press the F12, F10, ESC or DEL key during the startup process to select the boot order or the drive on which Windows Defender Offline is installed. For those users downloading Windows Defender Offline directly to the infected PC, it will automatically restart into the recovery environment and run Defender as soon as the download is complete. In all cases, BitLocker must be disabled to use Windows Defender Offline.

The AV-TEST Institute tests 22 antivirus software programs for Windows home users and ranks them on protection, performance and usability. Although Windows Defender doesn't place that highly on this list, it is free, and is certainly better than having no antimalware protection.

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Next Steps

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This was last published in February 2016

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Besides Windows Defender, what antimalware products does your organization use, and why?
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We used a few over the years. Currently it's Symantec. We just don't feel comfortable with Microsoft's track record. To be honest I think last I talked to our networking guys they would prefer a Linux based solution.
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Our organization also uses Symantec, and Malwarebytes.  We got burned by Windows Defender, and several other of the options that were available because they missed malware and viruses that they should have caught.  While we know that nothing finds everything, we feel that with the options that we are using, work for us. 
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Another tool we have been using recently is MWAV by eScan. It takes a while to run but seems quite thorough.

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