Q

Identifying a virus hoax

Are these real viruses or hoaxes? I received an e-mail with this list: buddylst.exe; calcul8r.exe; CELCOM screen Saver or CELSAVER.EXE; deathpr.exe; einstein.exe; happ.exe; girls.exe; happy99.exe; japanese.exe; I love You; JOIN THE CREW O PENPALS Subject: Virus; keypress.exe; kitty.exe; monday.exe; OPEN.VERY COOL!:; teletubb.exe; The Phantom Menace; prettypark.exe; UP-GRADE INTERNET; perrin.exe; Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs; Win...

a Holiday.


Any files that may appear as attachments in e-mail could potentially be viruses. It is not wise to assume that because they have a name similar to that of a known hoax that they are safe.

To determine if the contents of an e-mail message are a hoax or not, I suggest you check out the www.vmyths.com Web site, which has an extensive listing of hoaxes.


For more information on this topic, visit these other searchSecurity resources:
Tech Tip: E-mail Security Issues
Chat Transcript: E-mail Security
Executive Security Briefing: Beating malware: Beyond antivirus software


This was first published in February 2002
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