Information security threats Definitions

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  • A

    advanced evasion technique (AET)

    An advanced evasion technique (AET) is a type of network attack that combines several different known evasion techniques on-the-fly to create a new technique that won't be recognized by an intrusion detection system

  • advanced persistent threat (APT)

    An advanced persistent threat is a network attack in which an unauthorized person gains access to a network and stays there undetected for a long period of time. The purpose of an APT attack is to steal data rather than to cause damage.

  • adware

    Adware is any software application in which advertising banners are displayed while a program is running.

  • alternate data stream (ADS)

    An alternate data stream (ADS) is a feature of Windows New Technology File System (NTFS) that contains metadata for locating a specific file by author or title.

  • Antigen

    Sybari's Antigen is antivirus software for Lotus Domino and Microsoft Exchange.

  • antimalware (anti-malware)

    Antimalware (anti-malware) is a type of software program designed to prevent, detect and remediate malware infections on individual computing devices and IT systems. The terms antivirus software and antimalware software are often used as synonyms.

  • antivirus software (antivirus program)

    Antivirus software is a class of program designed to prevent, detect and remove malware infections on individual computing devices, networks and IT systems.

  • application blacklisting

    Application blacklisting, sometimes just referred to as blacklisting, is a network administration practice used to prevent the execution of undesirable programs.  Such programs include not only those known to contain security threats or vulnerabilities but also those that are deemed inappropriate within a given organization. Blacklisting is the method used by most antivirus programs, intrusion prevention/detection systems and spam filters.

  • application whitelisting

    Application whitelisting is the practice of identifying applications that have been deemed safe for execution and restricting all other applications from running.

  • attack vector

    An attack vector is a path or means by which a hacker (or cracker) can gain access to a computer or network server in order to deliver a payload or malicious outcome.

  • B

    backdoor (computing)

    A backdoor is a means to access a computer system or encrypted data that bypasses the system's customary security mechanisms.

  • barnacle

    In a computer, a barnacle is unwanted programming, such as adware or spyware, that is downloaded and installed along with a user-requested program.

  • black hat

    Black hat refers to a hacker who breaks into a computer system or network with malicious intent. A black hat hacker may exploit security vulnerabilities for monetary gain; to steal or destroy private data; or to alter, disrupt or shut down websites and networks.

  • blended threat

    A blended threat is an exploit that combines elements of multiple types of malware and perhaps takes multiple attack vectors to increase the severity of damage and the speed of contagion.  

  • bogie (bogey)

    The term bogie, also spelled bogey, refers to a false blip on a radar display.

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