Information Security Definitions

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  • B

    botnet

    A botnet is a collection of internet-connected devices, which may include PCs, servers, mobile devices and internet of things devices, that are infected and controlled by a common type of malware, although users are often unaware of it.

  • brain fingerprinting

    Brain fingerprinting is a controversial technique that is advocated as a way to identify a terrorist or other dangerous person by measuring the "brainprint" of that person when shown a particular body of writing or an image that was previously familiar (such as of a training camp or manual).

  • bridge

    In telecommunication networks, a bridge is a product that connects a local area network (LAN) to another local area network that uses the same protocol (for example, Ethernet or token ring).

  • bring your own apps (BYOA)

    Bring your own apps (BYOA) is the trend toward employee use of third-party applications and cloud services in the workplace. BYOA, like the BYOD trend towards user-owned devices in the workplace, is an example of the increasing consumerization of IT.

  • Bring Your Own Authentication (BYOA)

    Bring Your Own Authentication (BYOA) is a computing concept in which employee-owned devices are used as authentication credentials within the enterprise.

  • browser hijacker (browser hijacking)

    A browser hijacker is a malware program that modifies web browser settings without the user's permission and redirects the user to websites the user had not intended to visit.

  • brute force cracking

    Brute force (also known as brute force cracking) is a trial and error method used by application programs to decode encrypted data such as passwords or Data Encryption Standard (DES) keys, through exhaustive effort (using brute force) rather than employing intellectual strategies.

  • buffer overflow

    A buffer overflow occurs when a program attempts to write more data to a fixed length block of memory, or buffer, than the buffer is allocated to hold. Buffer overflow exploits may enable remote execution of malicious code or denial of service attacks.

  • Bugbear

    Bugbear is a computer virus that spread in early October, 2002, infecting thousands of home and business computers. It is similar to an earlier virus, Klez, in terms of its invasion approach and rapid proliferation.

  • build your own app (BYOA)

    Build your own app (BYOA) is an increasing trend towards the creation of applications by people without software development skills.

  • BYOI (bring your own identity)

    BYOI (bring your own identity) is an approach to digital authentication in which an end user's username and password is managed by a third party such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+ or Amazon.

  • bypass

    Bypass, in general, means either to go around something by an external route rather than going through it, or the means of accomplishing that feat.

  • C

    cable modem

    A cable modem is a device that enables you to hook up your PC to a local cable TV line and receive data at about 1.5 Mbps.

  • cache cramming

    Cache cramming is a method of tricking a computer into running Java code it would not ordinarily run.

  • cache poisoning (domain name system poisoning or DNS cache poisoning)

    Cache poisoning, also called domain name system (DNS) poisoning or DNS cache poisoning, is the corruption of an Internet server's domain name system table by replacing an Internet address with that of another, rogue address.

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