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Containing ransomware outbreaks now a top infosec priority

Ransomware outbreaks are increasing in number and lethality. This collection of articles assesses current ransomware threats, how ransomware works and what infosec pros should do now to protect against a ransomware hack.

Introduction

Ransomware outbreaks are rampant and once you're a victim, it means the bad guys already have your data. So, the obvious first question is how to not be a victim. The second is, if it's too late and you've suffered a ransomware hack, how do you prevent the attackers from using it maliciously?

This guide is a collection of expert analysis and advice on the current state of the ransomware threat and what infosec pros can do in the event their company suffers a ransomware hack.

1Latest threats-

Ransomware outbreaks are growing rampant

Recent ransomware outbreaks have been notable for their "nastiness," as one set of researchers put it recently. Learn exactly what you're up against by reading this collection of articles. As Sun Tzu said in his book “The Art of War,” it's essential to know your enemy.

Feature

Are computer worms taking over the earth?

While worms – self-replicating computer programs that deliver malware to target computers – are hardly new, they also seem to be the future. Continue Reading

News

NotPetya ransomware does irreparable damage to files

Victims of the major ransomware hack known as NotPetya find that -- unlike with other ransomware -- their files are impossible to restore. Continue Reading

News

NotPetya tops list of most destructive ransomware attacks

NotPetya, the "nastiest" ransomware attack of 2017, and other similar ransomware hacks, have caused unprecedented damage to businesses, infrastructure and users, say threat researchers. Continue Reading

News

New malware raises fears of third global ransomware attack

A bogus Adobe Flash update ransomware attack similar to WannaCry and NotPeya hit organizations in Russia, Ukraine, Turkey, Bulgaria and Germany. Continue Reading

News

Bad Rabbit, Petya ransomware attacks strikingly similar

According to threat researchers, the Bad Rabbit ransomware that began to spread through Russia and Ukraine in late 2017 is based on infrastructure and initial compromises that began in early 2016 and resembles NotPetya ransomware in striking ways. Continue Reading

2Social engineering-

How ransomware hackers manipulate end users

A major factor in the spread of ransomware is the use of innocent end users to spread the virus. Learn how hackers widen ransomware outbreaks via social engineering techniques and discover what infosecs can do to stem them.

Opinion

Employees have enough to worry about with social engineering

What security controls best ensure a safe working environment? Expecting employees to be the first line of cyberdefense isn't realistic or fair. Continue Reading

Tip

Deadly embrace: Social engineering attacks online personas

How far will attackers go to plan social engineering attacks? Nick Lewis explains the progression of threats and how it's changing the way we monitor social media. Continue Reading

Feature

'Deception in the Digital Age': The variety of cyber scams

Social engineering is a digital sleight of hand used in a variety of cyber scams like phishing, watering hole attacks and scareware. Continue Reading

Answer

Teach customer service staff to spot social engineering attacks

Social engineering emails regularly target customer service staff, lead to the spread of malware. Expert Nick Lewis explains how to identify and prevent these attacks. Continue Reading

3Ransomware recovery-

How to fortify against a ransomware outbreak

Ransomware outbreaks can be scary, but they don't mean your systems are defenseless. Learn what tools exist to prevent a ransomware attack -- you may discover you have tools already on hand that are effective against ransomware as well as the threat they were originally purchased for. If the worst happens and you suffer a ransomware hack, there are still solutions for lessening the impact; what's important is that you plan now.

Tip

A continuity checklist to protect against ransomware

Planning ahead is essential to ensure protection against ransomware. Set up your business continuity and disaster recovery plan and save your business money and time in the event of an attack. Continue Reading

Answer

Can WannaCry decryptor tools work on other strains?

Researchers created WannaCry decryptor tools after that ransomware's outbreak. Expert Matthew Pascucci explains how they work -- and if they work on other strains of ransomware. Continue Reading

Answer

What does the NIST suggest for ransomware recoveries?

Learn what you'll need if ransomware strikes and you must launch a recovery effort. Expert Judith Myerson looks at the latest NIST recommendations for enterprises. Continue Reading

Feature

Tools to fight the ransomware scourge

Learn all about ransomware prevention tools you need to consider now, and how to perfect the tools your company already owns. Continue Reading

4Cloud threats-

Ransomware outbreaks can even enter the cloud

It's unfortunate but true: Moving your most valuable data to the cloud doesn't necessarily protect it if your company suffers a ransomware hack. Learn what ransomware can do in the cloud, and what infosec pros can do about that.

Opinion

Use data protection techniques and give ransomware the boot

Done right, data protection -- such as cloud-based disaster recovery -- is the best countermeasure organizations have to counter ransomware hacks. Continue Reading

News

MIT expects ransomware to hit cloud computing in 2018

Ransomware that targets cloud services is one of the biggest cyber threats organizations will face in 2018, according to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Continue Reading

Tip

How to handle the ransomware threat in cloud

Yes, there's ransomware in the cloud and it differs from traditional ransomware attacks. Learn how to prepare for both varieties. Continue Reading

Tip

Putting it in the cloud doesn't always mean you're safe

Storing data in the cloud doesn't always protect you from an outbreak of ransomware. Expert Rob Shapland examines how the cloud helps and hurts when it comes to ransomware attacks. Continue Reading

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