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Access "Enforcing endpoint security"

Published: 18 Oct 2012

Malware-infested, non-compliant endpoints can bring even a well-secured network to its knees unless steps are taken to assess and prevent damage. Checking the health and posture of every IP-enabled device connected to a network then taking action to enforce compliance may be a simple concept, but deployment can be tricky. According to Forrester Research, 40 percent of enterprises have started network access control (NAC) initiatives in which endpoint integrity can play a role, but only four percent have completed them. Many promising projects are abandoned, victims of overly-ambitious goals, ineffective implementations, or inter-organizational struggles. So what does it take to plan, implement, and maintain a practical-yet-effective endpoint integrity enforcement program? We asked several adopters about their experiences to uncover the secrets to success and pitfalls to avoid. These diverse implementations served varied populations but all employed some essential best practices. (see below). BEST PRACTICES Organizations offer nine tips for successful ... Access >>>

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