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Access "Insecure software: A never-ending saga"

Published: 19 Oct 2012

Ah, summer. Time to kick back a little and enjoy the long days and warm weather. Uh, well not so much if you're an information security professional. There's never any respite from the seemingly endless stream of new software vulnerabilities and patches to apply. Already in June, we had a bumper crop of patches from Microsoft, which coincided with a flaw in Adobe's Flash Player, Reader, and Acrobat products. Plus, attackers quickly exploited a zero-day vulnerability in the Windows XP Help and Support Center component, which was disclosed by a Google engineer (and unleashed a renewed debate over responsible disclosure, a whole other topic we won't rehash here). Of course, the bad news wasn't limited to commercial software. AT&T made headlines for all the wrong reasons with its poor Web application security that was uncovered by a small security research firm and exposed the email of thousands of iPad 3G users. The industry has preached the need for software security and secure coding for several years now. After all, if software is designed securely from the ... Access >>>

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