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Access "Address IPv6 security before your time runs out"

Published: 25 Mar 2013

Time, and space—address space that is—are running out. Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4), the networking standard on which the Internet has been built, is expected to reach its IP address limit of roughly 4.3 billion in a few years. While most enterprises can survive for now with just a handful of IP addresses (thanks to Network Address Translators—NATs—which allow multiple devices to be connected to the public Internet with a single public IPv4 address), the burgeoning number of Internet-connected mobile devices and non-traditional objects like cars, appliances and smart meters demands that the Internet’s phone book expand its listings. Enter Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6). IPv6 was designed to succeed IPv4 and accommodate the future growth of the Internet by providing a much larger address pool than IPv4. Hopefully, this isn’t the first time you’ve read about IPv6: awareness activities, such as the World IPv6 Launch Day, and the deployment of IPv6 in large content providers such as Google and Facebook, has been going on for years, and recently ... Access >>>

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What's Inside

Features
    • Managing identities in hybrid worlds by Peter H. Gregory

      Are you losing control of access management as SaaS and mobile devices take hold? To achieve better operational consistency and scale, consider a centralized IAM system.

    • Address IPv6 security before your time runs out by Fernando Gont

      Most networks have partial deployment of IPv6 often without IT realizing it. It’s time to take stock of the security implications before attackers do.

    • Botnet takedowns: A dramatic defense by Kathleen Richards

      The infections and cyberattacks that botnets are used to launch remain hard-to-detect malware threats that have moved beyond PCs to mobile devices.

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