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April 2009

SaaS security risks must be addressed

The lure of software-as-a-service is simple: It comes down to cold hard cash. So in this economic environment, it comes as no surprise that organizations, large and small, are looking to SaaS providers to offer them services where they pay for infrastructure or expertise on a monthly basis. Salesforce.com is the poster child for the SaaS space offering hosted CRM. Other business applications using the SaaS model include HR, expense reporting and the like. We've seen SaaS models also pop up in the security space with Qualys, Webroot, Google, Veracode, Zscaler, Purewire , among others, offering security services ranging from messaging security to vulnerability assessment to application security testing. With huge data centers, Amazon and Google rent their capacity on a by-job basis. It seems to me that in a relatively short amount of time this will be the way we use computing power and access applications. It will radically change the ways businesses operate -- much like what Web browsers and email did in the 1990s. And you've got...

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Features in this issue

  • Tabletop exercises sharpen security and business continuity

    Delaware's Dept. of Technology and Information conducts annual incident response exercises that test the readiness of state agencies to respond to real attacks. Learn how simulated cyberattacks and incident response exercises help organizations prevent future attacks and maintain business continuity.

  • Tying log management and identity management shortens incident response

    Tying log management to user identity shortens incident response and forensics investigation cycles. Learn how compliance has mandated that organizations determine not only when incidents occurred, but who is responsible for unauthorized access.

  • Data loss prevention benefits in the real world

    by  Rich Mogull

    DLP promises strong data protection via content inspection and security monitoring, but real-world implementations can be complex and expensive; these eight real-world lessons help you use DLP to its fullest.

Columns in this issue

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SearchConsumerization

SearchEnterpriseDesktop

SearchCloudComputing

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