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April 2009

Tabletop exercises sharpen security and business continuity

If you're an NFL fan in April, you're well familiar with mock drafts. These pretend exercises portend to make a best guess at whom your favorite football franchise will select on Draft Day. Granted, while teams may be worth hundreds of millions of dollars, the NFL isn't playing the same high-stakes game as the federal and state governments. So when a state such as Delaware calls all hands on deck for a mock exercise simulating a coordinated attack on information systems and communications, there's more at stake than who will be taking snaps for the next 10 seasons. Lives, critical infrastructure and national security are on the line. Delaware's Dept. of Technology and Information (DTI) had conducted tabletop incident response exercises since 2005 to great results. Year after year, new insight was gained into technology and processes that weren't up to speed or needed a tweak. But the tabletop format was losing steam and organizers feared what had long been an effective evaluation tool would lose its value. IT people in ...

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Features in this issue

  • Tabletop exercises sharpen security and business continuity

    Delaware's Dept. of Technology and Information conducts annual incident response exercises that test the readiness of state agencies to respond to real attacks. Learn how simulated cyberattacks and incident response exercises help organizations prevent future attacks and maintain business continuity.

  • Tying log management and identity management shortens incident response

    Tying log management to user identity shortens incident response and forensics investigation cycles. Learn how compliance has mandated that organizations determine not only when incidents occurred, but who is responsible for unauthorized access.

  • Data loss prevention benefits in the real world

    by  Rich Mogull

    DLP promises strong data protection via content inspection and security monitoring, but real-world implementations can be complex and expensive; these eight real-world lessons help you use DLP to its fullest.

Columns in this issue

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