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October 2005

Digital Rights Management: Microsoft Windows Rights Management Services

Windows Rights Management Services Microsoft Price: Starts at $37 per user @exb Microsoft's Windows Rights Management Services @exe Intellectual property has never been more at risk. E-mail and IM can put it in a competitor's hands in a heartbeat; it can walk out the door on a CD, USB stick, MP3 player or laptop hard drive. Regulations like HIPAA and SOX pile civil and criminal penalties on top of traditional business risks. Much of this critical information is created in ubiquitous Microsoft Office apps--Word, Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint--which is, in itself, a strong case for considering Windows Rights Management Services (RMS) to identify and protect sensitive documents. For example, a user could apply a rights policy to a Word document that allows members of the accounting department to modify the contents, and denies access to everyone else in the organization. Unlike traditional ACL entries used on all file servers, these permissions are embedded within the document, so that it's protected even if it's sent off site. With ...

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Features in this issue

  • Security Seven Awards

    Seven winners. Seven verticals. Countless achievements.
    Education: Dave Dittrich
    Financial Services: Christofer Hoff
    Telecommunications: Edward Amoroso
    Government: Charles McGann
    Energy: Richard Jackson
    Manufacturing: Hans-Ottmar Beckmann
    Health Care: Patrick Heim
    Profiles by Michael S. Mimoso, Bill Brenner, Herman Mehling, Susan Hildreth, Mark Baard

  • Antispyware: Blue Coat Systems' Spyware Interceptor SI-1

    Blue Coat Systems' Spyware Interceptor SI-1

  • SQL Server 2005 Premieres

    Next month, Microsoft adds a star-studded cast of security features to its database system.

Columns in this issue

SearchCloudSecurity

SearchNetworking

SearchCIO

SearchConsumerization

SearchEnterpriseDesktop

SearchCloudComputing

ComputerWeekly

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