Premium Content

Access "Command-and-control servers: The puppet masters that govern malware"

Adam Rice and James Ringold Published: 02 Jun 2014

Command-and-control servers, also called C&C or C2, are used by attackers to maintain communications with compromised systems within a target network. The terms "command" and "control" are often bandied about without a clear understanding, even among some security professionals, of how these communications techniques work to govern malware. Half of the 315 security professionals surveyed about malware at organizations with more than 1,000 employees were "not very familiar" or "not at all familiar" with command-and-control communications techniques, according to Enterprise Strategy Group research. The knowledge gap widened based on their organization's security resources, from 24% of those with advanced security programs to 48% with average resources, and 82% with basic cybersecurity. As the name implies, command-and-control servers issue commands and controls to compromised systems (often Internet-connected computers of home users that then form zombie armies known as botnets). These communications can be as simple as maintaining a timed beacon or "heartbeat... Access >>>

Access TechTarget
Premium Content for Free.

By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy

What's Inside

Features

More Premium Content Accessible For Free

  • How to respond to the latest distributed denial-of-service attacks
    DDOS_attacks.png
    E-Handbook

    All indications show that DDoS attacks are increasing in variety, number and size. No network system is immune and information security pros can't ...

  • Figuring out FIDO as the first products emerge
    ISM_0514.png
    E-Zine

    The Fast Identity Online (FIDO) standards reached the public draft stage in February, and the first deployments of FIDO-ready technologies followed ...

  • Secure file transfer: Send large files fast, but keep your system safe
    secure_file_transfer.png
    E-Handbook

    FTP gets big files to colleagues and clients fast, but as the headlines remind us, the threat of electronic break-ins is real. This guide to secure ...