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How Sarbanes-Oxley changed the information security profession

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Where Are They Now?

8 Kevin Poulsen
Senior editor, Wired

Kevin Poulsen's high-profile hacker exploits are in the distant past. He is a senior editor at Wired News and previously wrote news for SecurityFocus. Long before he became a journalist, his hacks included taking over the phone lines of a Los Angeles radio station to ensure he'd be the 102nd caller, netting him a Porsche and cash. Last year at Wired, he uncovered the prevalence of registered sex offenders, including pedophiles, on

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MySpace.com.


9 Bill Larson
Parts unknown

Bill Larson, former CEO of Network Associates (now McAfee), appears to have retreated from public life. During his eight-year reign at Network Associates, he oversaw 14 acquisitions and turned the company into an antivirus leader before leaving in the aftermath of an accounting scandal in 2000. Since then, Larson served on the board of directors for several technology companies, including Proofpoint. A Proofpoint spokesperson described him now only as a private citizen.


10 Eric Corley
Publisher, 2600: The Hacker Quarterly Eric Corley, aka Emmanuel Goldstein, is the publisher of the long-standing hacker magazine 2600: The Hacker Quarterly. Corley is a multimedia figure; he also hosts a radio show for hackers called "Off the Hook" on WBAI-FM in New York, and another current events show called "Off the Wall" on WUSB-FM on Long Island, N.Y. Corley was the lone defendant in a 2000 appeal of a ruling in favor of the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), which wanted to bar sites from offering code that would decrypt DVDs. 2600.com was hosting DeCSS source code that could be used to beat the ontent-Scrambling System used by DVDs. Corley solely took on the MPAA and challenged the legality of the Digital Millenium Copyright Act to no avail.

2600: The Hacker Quarterly continues to publish quarterly, as it has since 1984.

 

This was first published in January 2008

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