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Advanced malware detection is crucial to enterprise defense

In his presentation, Peter Sullivan explains the newest malware threats and how IT teams need tools with advanced malware detection capabilities to protect their networks now.

 

Sullivan opens by defining what the term advanced malware means today, and then explores how this malicious and stealthy software targets network vulnerabilities and aims to infiltrate them and even destroy systems and data. He also reviews the damage caused by various varieties of advanced malware, but notes that the "real problem" for InfoSec pros is the detecting the intrusions in the first place. Common network defenses, like the firewall, are no longer enough; tools that conduct network traffic analysis are essential.

 

View this webcast to learn all about the threat that advanced malware poses and the latest advances in network defense that are becoming essential components of a modern network security system. 

 

About the author: Peter Sullivan began his career in network operations, information security and incident response 20 years ago with the U.S. Army. For the last ten years, Sullivan has been a visiting scientist at the Software Engineering Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, where he teaches courses in risk management, information security and assurance, computer security incident response and digital forensics. He is also a partner with InfoSecure Solutions, LLC, a Massachusetts based consultancy specializing in IT risk management and incident response planning. Sullivan holds a CISSP certification and a CERT/CC Computer Security Incident Handling (CSIH) certification.

 

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This topic is very helpful.
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Good information; thanks for posting. Yet I'm troubled that any "detect and protect" approach is still missing a huge part of the problem. Prevent! We need a system that can't be hacked so easily. Yes, I know the Chinese built a wall and Kings built castles, that were (almost) invariably breached. But aren't we supposed to be smarter than that? Can't we figure out how to build a usable Fort Knox for data? While we still have the data to secure....
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Good information; thanks for posting. Yet I'm troubled that any "detect and protect" approach is still missing a huge part of the problem. Prevent! We need a system that can't be hacked so easily. Yes, I know the Chinese built a wall and Kings built castles, that were (almost) invariably breached. But aren't we supposed to be smarter than that? Can't we figure out how to build a usable Fort Knox for data? While we still have the data to secure....
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Nice article. Like ncberns mentioned the biggest issue will always be prevent. We put rules and policies in place and continue to let things go and not enforce them. We can build a fifty foot wall to protect our data and then give someone the key to open it. They lose the key and we are sunk. Even worse if they feel they are taken advantage of and somebody offers to buy the key, they may sell it for large sums of cash. 
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