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TIBCO agrees to acquire SIEM vendor LogLogic

Another day, another security information and event management vendor acquired. Well, O.K, the deals aren’t that frequent, but standalone SIEM vendors have become popular acquisition targets. On Tuesday, TIBCO Software announced that it inked a deal to acquire SIEM vendor LogLogic.

Last fall, IBM bought SIEM vendor Q1 Labs and McAfee acquired NitroSecurity. SolarWinds, an IT management software company bought TriGeo, a SIEM provider that targeted midsize companies. In 2010, HP bought Arcsight and Trustwave acquired Intellitactics.

The TIBCO-LogLogic deal is a bit unusual – TIBCO is an integration software company and an unfamiliar entity in the security market. Palo Alto, Calif.-based TIBCO said the deal will expand its operational intelligence offerings while giving customers the ability to monitor threats, assess risks and address threats. The company is also describing the deal as a big data play.

“Enterprises must be able to analyze big data, including machine data generated from across their various systems, to gain comprehensive, real-time insights into critical business questions relating to compliance, security and operations,” the company said. “LogLogic will build upon TIBCO’s proven capabilities in event processing and in-memory analytics.”

San Jose, Calif.-based LogLogic touts its ability to provide SIEM and log management capabilities in a single architecture.

SIEM suppliers such as HP and IBM have been talking up the technology’s future as providing analytics and a comprehensive view of an organization’s threat environment. Time will tell if their efforts – and now TIBCO’s – will pan out.

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How far in the future can you plan out IT, given how fast technology changes?
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If you plan is shorter than 3 years, preferably 7 years, you have no path and will end up in fire fighting mode all the time. The challenge is creating a "GPS" vs a "paper map" so that you can re-route as the company goals change.
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Life offers no guarantees for stability. No one thinks anything predictable could come of giving the average two - year - old a stick of lit dynamite. Fukushima and other unguarded nuclear power is our dynamite. Hold our breath and hope we survive. Technology on a fried planet can't save us now.
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Less than a year is not relevant and more than a year is not relevant too
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Technology may move fast but business still plays catch up to that technology at the least 1yr. CFO’s usually don’t want to get the new bright and shiny when what they currently have works especially if it is going to cost a lot.
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Plans are made in sand, goals are written in stone! Plans change also!
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I believe that five yrs is enough time for a business to plan out their IT. Given that technology keeps changing at a more faster pace but then let’s say a desktops are bought today only to replace them after a year, this I believe would not be healthy for the finances of the business
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One year at the outermost. Six months still can see new technology introduced that changes the general landscape too much to stick to a course that was set in ignorance of the unknown surprise innovation.
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It depends on the industry but anything over 6 months indicates a very mature industry without much innovation.
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Plan out IT is pretty vague. Infrastructure planing can take months (3, 6, 9+) depending on the size of the enterprise, and apps can be developed in days …
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Planning as a static document for a fixed interval is dead. Planning is becoming sentient, costly adjusting to surroundings. The ability to capture and evaluate data at real time allows this planning as a living\evolving document.
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It fits well within the product life cycles, market learning and acceptance of new products and organizational purchasing processes.
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You map to outcomes without worrying about the technology piece parts. You know baseline costs now, and can project modest price decreases for budgeting purposes. Deal sizes shrink, but the focus on outcomes enables the forecasting of what will happen to your business. Critical to this will be changing the way procurement views IT acquisition, which is the biggest impediment to outcome based IT consumption models at this point in time. What works to save money on bulk purchase of light bulbs and paper products does not work with procuring IT in the cloud enabled environment that will transition us out into a true, cognitive computing era.
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The world is becoming more complex more quickly than our aboriginal brain architecture can even begin to manage.
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One can't gather TODAYS information fast enough to predict tomorrow much less keep up enough to forecast the future. Not yet !
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From the time options offer, one year is the closest to our budget, project and planning cycles at this given time. One must also accept that there are other factors such as the time value of money, risk-reward and employee change absorption that must be factored into the rate and amplitude of organizational change. The value of any given change must meet or exceed the initial cost; not all new innovations last long enough or acquire sufficient market traction to sustain themselves (and their users) so risks must be managed; and employees must be able to achieve levels of competence within the new environment to master new processes and business structures such that they can contribute and constructively participate in the next iteration change. Our reality is closer to 2-3 years, certainly shorter than 5.
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You have to be particularly careful to weigh the risks of large, capital investments that promise nirvana in the future at the expense of locked in costs today. Years ago ATM was supposed to replace the primitive ethernet technology. It was a big oops for those CIO's who spend their firm's cash on a technology bet that went wrong.
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The IT develops exponentially but did anybody analize how problems evolve in time? A good guess would be very frequently also exponentially. So, how is it possible that the effect is still exponential? That's because we tend to solve a more simple problem earier. In very exceptional cases when we wanted to skip simple solutions we always got true benefits, guaranteed.
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We still don't have flying cars ...
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