Network security Definitions

  • A

    access log

    An access log is a list of all the requests for individual files that people have requested from a Web site.

  • Advanced Encryption Standard (AES)

    The Advanced Encryption Standard, or AES, is a symmetric block cipher used by the U.S. government to protect classified information and is implemented in software and hardware throughout the world to encrypt sensitive data.

  • advanced evasion technique (AET)

    An advanced evasion technique (AET) is a type of network attack that combines several different known evasion techniques on-the-fly to create a new technique that won't be recognized by an intrusion detection system

  • antivirus software (antivirus program)

    Antivirus software is a class of program designed to prevent, detect and remove malware infections on individual computing devices, networks and IT systems.

  • application whitelisting

    Application whitelisting is the practice of identifying applications that have been deemed safe for execution and restricting all other applications from running.

  • authentication

    Authentication is the process of determining whether someone or something is, in fact, who or what it is declared to be.

  • B

    backdoor (computing)

    A backdoor is a means to access a computer system or encrypted data that bypasses the system's customary security mechanisms.

  • bastion host

    On the Internet, a bastion host is the only host computer that a company allows to be addressed directly from the public network and that is designed to screen the rest of its network from security exposure.

  • bridge

    In telecommunication networks, a bridge is a product that connects a local area network (LAN) to another local area network that uses the same protocol (for example, Ethernet or token ring).

  • browser hijacker (browser hijacking)

    A browser hijacker is a malware program that modifies web browser settings without the user's permission and redirects the user to websites the user had not intended to visit.

  • brute force cracking

    Brute force (also known as brute force cracking) is a trial and error method used by application programs to decode encrypted data such as passwords or Data Encryption Standard (DES) keys, through exhaustive effort (using brute force) rather than employing intellectual strategies.

  • buffer overflow

    A buffer overflow occurs when a program attempts to write more data to a fixed length block of memory, or buffer, than the buffer is allocated to hold. Buffer overflow exploits may enable remote execution of malicious code or denial of service attacks.

  • C

    CAPTCHA (Completely Automated Public Turing Test to Tell Computers and Humans Apart)

    A CAPTCHA (Completely Automated Public Turing Test to Tell Computers and Humans Apart) is a type of challenge-response system designed to differentiate humans from robotic software programs.

  • Crash Course: Spyware

    In general, spyware is any technology that aids in gathering information about a person or organization without their knowledge.

  • D

    defense in depth

    Defense in depth is the coordinated use of multiple security countermeasures to protect the integrity of the information assets in an enterprise... (Continued)

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