Access management Definitions

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  • A

    AAA server (authentication, authorization, and accounting)

    An AAA server is a server program that handles user requests for access to computer resources and, for an enterprise, provides authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) services.

  • access control

    Access control is a security technique that regulates who or what can view or use resources in a computing environment.

  • authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA)

    Authentication, authorization, and accounting (AAA) is a framework for intelligently controlling access to computer resources, enforcing policies, auditing usage, and providing the information necessary to bill for services.

  • B

    bimodal IAM (bimodal identity access management)

    Bimodal identity and access management (IAM) uses two forms of credentials, internal and external, as a method of authentication.

  • BYOI (bring your own identity)

    BYOI (bring your own identity) is an approach to digital authentication in which an end user's username and password is managed by a third party such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+ or Amazon.

  • E

    employee onboarding and offboarding

    Employee onboarding and offboarding are two core HR activities that are gaining in importance.

  • F

    federated identity management

    Federated identity management (FIM) is an arrangement that can be made between multiple enterprises to let subscribers use the same identification data to obtain access to the networks of all the enterprises in the group.

  • I

    identity and access management (IAM)

    Identity and access management (IAM) is a framework for business processes that facilitates the management of electronic or digital identities.

  • identity governance

    Identity governance is the policy-based centralized orchestration of user identity management and access control.

  • L

    logon (or login)

    In general computer usage, logon is the procedure used to get access to an operating system or application, usually in a remote computer.

  • M

    mandatory access control (MAC)

    Mandatory access control (MAC) is a system-controlled policy restricting access to resource objects (such as data files, devices, systems, etc.) based on the level of authorization or clearance of the accessing entity, be it person, process, or device.

  • P

    password synchronization

    Password synchronization is an authentication process that coordinates user passwords across various computers and computing devices so a user only has to remember a single password instead of multiple passwords for different machines or devices.

  • principle of least privilege (POLP)

    The principle of least privilege (POLP), an important concept in computer security, is the practice of limiting access rights for users to the bare minimum permissions they need to perform their work.

  • privilege creep

    Privilege creep is the accumulation of IT access privileges beyond what an end user needs to do his or her job.

  • R

    RADIUS (Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service)

    Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service (RADIUS) is a client/server protocol and software that enables remote access servers to communicate with a central server to authenticate dial-in users and authorize their access to the requested system or service.

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